Development of the 'audio-visual opera', 'A Requiem for Edward Snowden'


Quote

May 23, 2014
@ 5:19 am
Permalink

A top-secret Pentagon report to assess the damage to national security from the leak of classified National Security Agency documents by Edward Snowden concluded that “the scope of the compromised knowledge related to US intelligence capabilities is staggering”. No evidence has surfaced to support persistent claims from pundits and lawmakers that Snowden has provided any of the NSA documents he obtained to a “foreign adversary”.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/22/pentagon-report-snowden-leaks-national-security


Photoset

May 23, 2014
@ 5:17 am
Permalink

Some stills from some further Audio Visual Experiments, visuals by Jules Rawlinson


Quote

May 9, 2014
@ 11:16 am
Permalink

Edward Snowden’s disclosures of the scale of mass surveillance are “an embarrassing indictment” of the weak nature of the oversight and legal accountability of Britain’s security and intelligence agencies, MPs have concluded

The Guardian:

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/may/09/edward-snowden-mps-commons-report-spying


Video

Apr 10, 2014
@ 9:16 am
Permalink

A Glimpse into the piece so far…some experiments with some early parts of the score with visual processing by Jules Rawlinson. Clarinet by Pete Furniss.


Text

Apr 9, 2014
@ 3:58 am
Permalink

Intro…

'Requiem for Edward Snowden' is a large scale live audiovisual performance piece. The piece focuses on a number of themes which are extremely relevant to our lives in the 21st century, based around the actions and decisions of whistleblower Edward Snowden; loss of faith and security, the hacking of digital media, invasion of privacy and personal sacrifice.

The documents released by Snowden reveal that we live in a world in which we are totally reliant not just on methods of communication, but on daily routines in which our privacy is completely compromised. The piece explores the consequences of this situation through a combination of electronic sound, acoustic instrumentation and live visuals. The gestures and performance from two live electronics performers, a clarinetist and string section are analysed and interact with real-time visual work by Jules Rawlinson (http://www.pixelmechanics.com/), exploring the piece’s central themes at sonic and visual levels.

The project is supported by Creative Scotland and New Media Scotland

This blog documents the development of the project.


Photo

Apr 9, 2014
@ 3:57 am
Permalink